D&D 5e: Gnome Ranger Guide

D&D 5e: Gnome Ranger Guide

Do you want to play a character that can keep a pet animal around and use it in and out of combat? Do you want to be able to ride your animal companion as you go on expeditions and adventures? Are you more of a distance player rather than a close-combat fighter? 

If you want to be all these things in D&D, then you’ll do well as a Gnome Ranger.

How to Make a Gnome Ranger

When you roll a Gnome Ranger, your highest stat should be your Dexterity, followed by your Wisdom. However, if you plan to use melee weapons or focus on two-weapon fighting, you’ll need Strength first. Dexterity will follow after that.

The optimal Gnome subrace for Rangers is the Forest Gnome. Their Speak with Small Beasts ability fits the Beast Master archetype well. Your Dexterity ability score will also go up by 1. The ideal backgrounds for Rangers include the Outlander and Folk Hero.

Speaking of subclasses, if you want an animal friend, get the Beast Master archetype. Together, you and your animal companion can assist the party in many fun and unique ways. The other subclass is the Hunter, which lets you focus on dealing more damage in combat.

How to Play a Gnome Ranger

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Skyserpent

Rangers specialize in hunting down beasts and monsters. Your Gnome Ranger’s attacks and magic can deal hefty damage. Here are some useful spells for Rangers:

  • Hunter’s Mark
  • Cure Wounds
  • Hail of Thorns
  • Pass without Trace

When in your favored terrain, you gain benefits like becoming stealthier and alert. This is useful, especially if you’re trying to hunt down an elusive target. You’ll also be more effective when fighting against your favored enemy. 

How to Roleplay as a Gnome Ranger

Gnomes are jolly, curious, and impulsive creatures. They are also creative, often becoming inventors. You can take this personality and convert it into a voice. For example, your character often talks fast to convey their long-winded and complicated ideas.

When you roleplay, find something you’re interested in personally and transfer that curiosity to your character. For example, if you like trying new food, then why not make a food connoisseur of your Gnome Ranger?

Here’s a quick example of such a backstory for your ranger:

Gimble Gerrick enjoys visiting the cities and nearby towns often, despite his people being of the forest. The towns offered more diversity in their food culture, and, of course, so did the cities. Despite his passions, he was quite a skilled forest hunter.

When he was of age, he left home to dabble in cooking and, as he calls it, “chef-ing.” One day, a curious band of strangers came by the pub where Gimble worked. The table where they sat was empty one moment, and then full with a feast of unfamiliar and exotic foods the next. Following his passions, Gimble decided to quit his job and leave with the band of strangers.

Sage Gamers

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